Health & Nutrition
Apr 7, 2021

High Blood Pressure diet with diet chart & nutrition

There are no warning signs. There are no symptoms. You don’t feel it. It’s insidious. It’s called Hypertension or High Blood Pressure. According to the Global Burden of Disease Study, people with high blood pressure are at the greatest risk of ill health and early death.

High blood pressure not just puts at a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases or heart attack but can also affect the brain, kidneys, and eyes. Since this condition is symptomless, most people have no idea they are at risk until it is too late. If diagnosed in time, you should not make the mistake of underestimating it.

An ideal blood pressure (BP) lies between 90/60 and 120/80 and is considered to be high if consistently above 140/90. It is basically a measure of the pressure in the heart when it pumps out blood around the body over the pressure when the heart is resting.

Blood Pressure rises as you get older, fatter, less active, drink more alcohol, and eat more salt. You may have an inherited tendency to high BP so even if you are slim, teetotal, active, and eat a great diet, you may be advised to take medication to keep your BP in the healthy range

Keeping your blood pressure under control takes more than avoiding high salt foods. It takes an overhaul of your lifestyle and committing to a diet plan that helps you tame your troubled blood pressure readings. The scientists found that people who consume more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains had lower pressure levels.

From this research, the original DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet was conceived. Today, DASH diet is by far the most common diet recommended for people who have high blood pressure. Other BP-friendly diets are based on the same principles.

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SYMPTOMS

· Headache

· Dizziness

· Impaired Vision

· Failing Memory

· Shortness of Breath

· GI (Gastrointestinal) Disturbances

· Nosebleeds

· Flushing

· Chest pain

· Blood in the urine

high blood pressure

RISK FACTORS FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

1. Gender

Studies have shown a higher prevalence among males from adolescence till 45 years of age. After this age, mean blood pressure values are higher in women.

2. Age

The older you are, the more likely you are to get high blood pressure. This is because, with age, our blood vessels gradually lose some of their elastic quality, which can contribute to increased blood pressure.

2. Heredity

If your parents or other close blood relatives have high blood pressure, there’s an increased chance that you will get it too.

3. Stress

it isn’t directly linked to high blood pressure but too much stress can encourage unhealthy behaviours that increase BP such as poor diet, using tobacco or drinking alcohol, poor sleep, and lack of physical activity.

4. Obesity

The risk of developing high blood pressure is 2 to 6 times higher in overweight than in normal-weight persons. The prevalence of high blood pressure in people with a BMI greater than 30 kg/meter square is 38% for men and 32% for women.

5. Physical Activity

Less active persons are 30–50% more likely to develop BP than their active counterparts.

6. High Cholesterol

More than half of people with high blood pressure also have high cholesterol.

7. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD)

High BP may occur as a result of kidney disease and having high BP may also cause further kidney damage.

high blood pressure

There are two types of hypertension:

Primary hypertension— Also known as essential hypertension, Primary hypertension develops over time. A majority of high blood pressure patients have this type of hypertension. While it has no identifiable cause, the following factors may play a role:

· Genes: Some people are genetically predisposed to Primary hypertension or high blood pressure.

· Physical changes: High blood pressure may be one of those issues that you experience when your body changes. For example, it’s thought that changes in your kidney function due to aging may upset the body’s natural balance of salts and fluid.

· Environment: Unhealthy lifestyle choices like lack of physical activity and poor diet lead to weight issues. Being overweight or obese can increase your risk for hypertension.

Secondary hypertension— Secondary hypertension often occurs quickly and can become more severe than primary hypertension. Several conditions that may cause secondary hypertension including:

· Kidney disease

· Obstructive sleep apnea

· Congenital heart defects

· Problems with your thyroid

· Side effects of medications

· Use of drugs

· Alcohol abuse or chronic use

· Adrenal gland problems

· Certain endocrine tumors

DIET PRINCIPLE FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Dietary recommendations for lowering blood pressure, such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, focuses on reducing your intake of fat, sodium, and alcohol. Following the DASH diet for two weeks can lower your systolic blood pressure (the top number of a blood pressure reading) by 8–14 points.

Serving suggestions for the DASH diet include:

Foods

Serving per day

Sodium

No more than 2,300 mg on a traditional diet or 1,500 mg on a low-sodium diet

Dairy (low-fat)

2 to 3

Healthy fats

2 to 3

Vegetables

4 to 5

Fruit

4 to 5

Nuts, seeds, and legumes

4 to 5

Lean meat, poultry, and fish

6

Whole grains

6 to 8

Overall, it is advised that you eat more low-fat protein sources, whole grains, and plenty of fruits and vegetables. The DASH guidelines also suggest eating more foods rich in potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

The guidelines also recommend no more than:

· Five servings of sweets per week

· One drink per day for women

· Two drinks per day for men

Foods to be avoided in High Blood Pressure

· Butter and margarine

· Frozen/Canned foods

· Fast foods

· Sweetened beverages

· Pickled foods

· Caffeine

· High-fat foods

· Salty snacks

· Pizza

· Sauces & Condiments

· Alcohol

Say No to Sodium, Spirit & Smoking

Basically, sodium makes you retain fluids, which adds to the whole pressure buildup. Restaurant and processed foods are the biggest culprits since these have high sodium levels. The Dietary Guidelines recommend that people with hypertension limit their salt to less than 1500 milligrams a day. Smoking and alcohol make the situation worse. Quitting might look difficult but it is not impossible.

high blood pressure
Pregnancy and High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure can be particularly harmful during pregnancy, which is known as gestational hypertension. If ignored or untreated, it can lead to complications such as pre-eclampsia stroke, preterm delivery, and low birth weight.

Consider Folic Acid Sources: Makkai, Lentils, Ladies finger, jackfruit, dates, guava pink flesh, mango, beetroot, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and sugarcane juice

Foods to be included in High Blood Pressure Diet

high blood pressure

Berries: A study found that consuming natural compounds called flavonoids, present in the berries — blueberries in particular — might prevent hypertension and lower high blood pressure.

high blood pressure

Bananas: The high potassium content in bananas plays a vital role in managing high blood pressure.

high blood pressure diet

Beets: The nitric oxide in beets can help open blood vessels and thus, lower blood pressure.

high blood pressure diet

Oats: An incredibly nutritious food, oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which may reduce cholesterol levels as well as lower blood pressure.

high blood pressure diet

Leafy vegetables: The potassium in leafy vegetables helps your kidneys get rid of more sodium through urine and this, in turn, helps lower the blood pressure. Include more spinach, cabbage, mustard greens, etc. in your diet.

high blood pressure diet chart

Garlic: It helps reduce blood pressure by increasing the amount of nitric oxide in the body, which helps promote vasodilation (widening of arteries).

high blood pressure diet chart

Yogurt: The calcium helps keep your blood vessels working exactly as they should.

high blood pressure diet chart

Pistachio: A rich source of essential nutrients for heart health, and blood pressure-regulating potassium, Pistachios help reduce peripheral vascular resistance or blood vessel tightening.

high blood pressure diet chart

Fish: A great source of lean protein, fatty fish such as salmon is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation and reduce triglycerides.

high blood pressure diet

Cinnamon: Studies have suggested that cinnamon helps dilate and relax the blood vessels, which may help with the problem of high blood pressure.


high blood pressure diet

Home Remedies For High Blood Pressure

· A healthy lifestyle can help you an edge over the factors that cause hypertension. Here are some of the most common home remedies that may help you beat the blood pressure:

· The first lifestyle change that you need to bring in is to limit your daily intake of sodium (salt). Along with this, reduce your fat intake as well. Instead, have more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. The DASH eating plan is good to follow and may help you lower the blood pressure.

· Exercising actually helps you maintain a healthy weight and as a result, keep your blood pressure within limits. You can either go for a high-intensity aerobic exercise for 60–90 minutes or moderate-intensity exercise for at least 120–150 minutes per week. Even brisk walking is good to start with.

· Stress can also make your blood pressure go up. So it is important to manage your stress levels by exercising, listening to music, taking up a hobby class, or meditating.

· For a real win over high blood pressure, you need to adopt a cleaner lifestyle, which means you need to quit smoking. The chemicals in tobacco smoke damage the body’s tissues and harden the blood vessel walls.

· Adopting a cleaner lifestyle also means you need to give up alcohol altogether. Alcohol can raise blood pressure.

high blood pressure diet

FOCUS ON THESE NUTRIENTS TO CONTROL HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Potassium push

Potassium works as a natural diuretic. It lowers pressure by promoting the excretion of sodium. It is also important for muscle function and the ability of blood vessels to relax and widen.

Rich Sources: Amaranth, rajma, moth beans, soybean, banana, dates, coconut, garden cress seeds, pistachios, cow milk, and khoa.

Concentrate on Calcium

Calcium helps blood vessels tighten and relax when they need to. It’s also crucial for healthy bones and the release of hormones and enzymes we need for most body functions.

Rich Sources: Milk and its products (paneer, khoa), sesame seeds, almonds, radish leaves, mustard leaves, amaranth leaves, soybean, and amaranth.

Maximize Magnesium

It plays an important role in regulating blood pressure. It supports many processes in the body, including muscle and nerve function, the immune system, and protein synthesis. Magnesium also helps move calcium into the bloodstream, where it needs to be to lower blood pressure.

Rich Sources: Amaranth, lentils, banana, peas, groundnuts, pine seeds and sunflower seeds.

High Blood Pressure Diet Chart

Early Morning (within 15 minutes of waking up): 2 glasses jeera water + almonds (7 soaked) + walnuts (2 soaked)

Breakfast: 1 toast + 2 omelet/ 2 dal veggie cheela

Mid-morning: 1 Coconut water + handful roasted flax seeds

Lunch: 1 bowl dal/palak/fish curry + 1 bowl rice + 1 bowl curd

Evening 5 pm: A bowl of papaya

Evening 7 pm: 1 bowl carrot tomato beetroot soup

Dinner: 1 bowl sabzi + 1 oats roti

Before Bedtime: 1 tsp triphala + water

A Morning Ritual for High Blood Pressure patients

Recipe

Ingredients

Coconut water 1 glass

Lemon Juice 2 tbsp

Chia seeds (soaked) 1 tbsp

Method: Mix all the ingredients properly. Have it

When to have it: Early morning empty stomach or mid-morning.

Why: It is fulfilling and controls high BP because of high potassium in coconut water and lemon juice. The chia seeds are high in fiber, magnesium, and potassium.

If you’re looking for a nutrition plan during your pregnancy and post pregnancy healthy weight loss, don't hesitate to call us on +91 84470 02584 or click here

FAQs:


What is high blood pressure?

An ideal blood pressure (BP) lies between 90/60 and 120/80 and is considered to be high if consistently above 140/90. It is basically a measure of the pressure in the heart when it pumps out blood around the body over the pressure when the heart is resting. High blood pressure not only puts individuals at a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases or heart attack, but can also affect the brain, kidneys, and eyes. Since this condition doesn’t have any drastic symptoms, most people have no idea they are at risk until it is too late.

What are some of the symptoms of high blood pressure?

The symptoms are a little hard to spot compared to other disorders/diseases. Headache, dizziness, impaired vision, poor memory, shortening breath, chest pain, the passage of blood in urine, nosebleeds and stomach disturbances could be pointing towards high BP.

What are the two types of high BP/hypertension?

The two types of hypertension are primary and secondary hypertension. Primary hypertension develops over time. A majority of high blood pressure patients have this type of hypertension. Genes, physical changes and unhealthy lifestyle choices are markers of this type of hypertension. 
Secondary hypertension often occurs quickly and can become more severe than primary hypertension. It can be caused by kidney disease, congenital heart defects, thyroid problems, drugs and alcohol abuse, endocrine tumors, obstructive sleep apnea and more. 

What causes hypertension/high BP

Age, hereditary factors,  obesity, lack of physical activity, high cholesterol, and chronic kidney disorders can lead to high BP. 

What kind of foods should high BP patients avoid?

Dietary recommendations for lowering blood pressure, such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, focuses on reducing your intake of fat, sodium, and alcohol. Following the DASH diet for two weeks can lower your systolic blood pressure (the top number of a blood pressure reading) by 8–14 points.

Caffeine, alcohol, high fat and high salt foods, pickled foods, pickles, sweet beverages, frozen and canned foods, pizza, bottled sauces and condiments should be avoided. 

What kind of foods should high BP patients eat?

Those with hypertension should consume berries, bananas, beetroot, oats, green leafy vegetables, garlic, yogurt, fish, pistachios, cinnamon, etc. Foods rich in potassium, calcium magnesium are your best friends. 


Posts you may like
Follow Us On
Instagram
Follow Us